ODI Cardiff's Mapping for Wales update

As we announced in November, we’ve received funding from the Welsh Government in order to produce an online Welsh language interface of OSM [Open Street Map].  

1st Progress report 

We’re very pleased to announce that we’ve already recruited a mapping infrastructure developer for our #MapioCymru project: Carl Morris has agreed to be our online developer for our pilot Welsh language interface for Open Street Map.

Carl has recently begun working freelance under his morris.cymru name after being one half of the successful Native HQ partnership.  He has an ocean of Welsh language experience and is keen to set his sights on the landscape of mapping Wales!

Croeso : welcome to the team Carl. : )

 

WE HAVE ALSO…

“…[met] with an officer of the Welsh Language Commissioner, who has a list of place names she approves with associated geodata…”

In line with our WG targets [see above], as soon as we received the news about the grant award in October we arranged to meet with WLC – who also process complaints pertaining to the Welsh Language Standards, which have in turn inspired many new Welsh language innovations.

We are also in touch with individuals who are already members of the GovCamp Cymru community & working at the Llyfrgell Genedlaethol / National Library  who look after the legacy for their Cynefin project.   Therefore, the first part of the work has been to see what’s already out there so there’s no unnecessary duplication of data.

WE WILL ALSO…

More to come soon, look out for our activity during January when we’ll be:

– publishing our Welsh language interface pilot
– attending haciaith and encouraging developers to make use of OSM
– starting to encourage organisations and communities in Wales to make use of the platform.

Let’s Map- io!

ODI Cardiff is working towards a Wales with a million Welsh speakers by 2050.

What are ODI Nodes: Creating a global network

The ODI Nodes are an important part of our global network. The last year has seen significant growth: we have welcomed Rio, Devon, Queensland and Athens to the community; our first group of nodes have become ODI registered trainers; our community of nodes have collaborated with us to deliver global projects; and the network is starting to develop commercial products.

This year we are introducing a framework of core activities for our nodes. Our ambition is to scale our existing business models – creating repeatable products and activities – to ensure nodes deliver consistent quality across the network. We have worked closely with our community over the past year and identified the key activities they will develop. The new focus will involve two categories of ODI Nodes:

  •   Network nodes – running meetups, holding meetings, building an individual membership network
    *   Learning nodes – running courses taught by an accredited trainer to teach local businesses and governments about how to work with open data

Starting the node network

The Open Data Institute (ODI HQ) opened in 2012 to catalyse open data culture in the UK. By 2013, we had received an overwhelming response from international organisations, many of which wanted to set up a local ODI in their own country, city or area. As a response, we collaborated with this community and built the ODI Node network, focussed on creating global impact from open data.

This table shows the focus of each node, for 2015:

Our ODI Node network is demonstrating how open data is helping to solve problems around the world. They are our local partners of choice for innovation projects and each will facilitate networking activities and learning opportunities within their local communities.