26.4.18 Pioneering Wales: #Cymraeg2050 Technology Cardiff innovation event

Hi!

The #mapioCymru ‘Mapping for Wales’ project has been invited to talk about

openstreetmap.cymru

at an innovation event this Thursday 26th April from 3pm at the Tramshed, Cardff.  This is an end-of-project event organised by our sponsors at the Welsh Government so we’re looking forward to seeing what the other invitees have been up to, too.

It would also seem to be a great excuse to show off our map, again:

[ which now displays events on a slippymap ! ]

Tickets for Cymru Arloesol: Technoleg Cymraeg 2050 / Pioneering Wales: #Cymraeg2050 Technology Cardiff can be ordered here .

Mapping Bangor [party!]

Bangor, aye:
This Wednesday 28th March, Canolfan Arloesi Pontio Innovation Centre, Ffordd Ddeiniol Rd, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2TQ  between 2-6pm
a #mapioCymru workshop to show how to set Welsh language namesets onto our  https://openstreetmap.cymru map, as sponsored by Welsh Government’s #Cymraeg2050 grant.
Our very own Angharad Owen will be leading the session as an alumni of Bangor University.
No need to book a place, simply turn up on the day if you’re in Bangor and into mapping.
Many thanks
@odicardiff

 

Mapping your Square Mile...

How to #mapioCymru ! This is how to begin:

  1. Go to openstreetmap.org
  2. Register a user name by using your email, facebook or Google account etc.
  3. Start using openstreetmap.org under your username & start mapping!

Adding a Welsh language name

Let’s say that you’d like to add the Welsh language version of a street name, e.g. Heol Y Prior in ‘Caerfyrddin’ [Carmarthen!].

    • Click the ‘Search’ button in your OpenStreetMap window, and type in the place name in English. 
    • Then, click on the appropriate name on the list that will appear on the left-hand side of the screen (making sure that you click on the right kind of place; for instance ‘Residential Road’ in this example as it could be a street, town, area, etc).  The item you’ve selected will appear in red, with all the information relating to it listed on the left, as is shown here:At the moment, this feature has no Welsh language name, so let’s go ahead and add it to the map!
    • Click on the triangle next to the Edit button at the top of the page and select ‘Edit with iD (in-browser editor)’
    • The map will appear as follows, with the feature that you’re editing flashing red:

    • On the left-hand side of the screen, under ‘Name’, you’ll be able to see a small cross [or add sign symbol]  ‘+’:
    • When you click on the cross, additional dialogues will open.
    • Start typing ‘Cymraeg’ [Welsh] in the first box, and then select ‘Cymraeg’ from the list that appears in blue.
    • In the second box, write the correct Welsh language place name for the feature you’re editing.

  • After making your edit, remember to press the ‘Save’ button at the top of the page.
  • The website will ask for a ‘Changeset Comment’ where you should explain any changes you’ve made.  This allows other users to see why you’ve made the change, so that they can verify it’s been done correctly.
  • You can also add ‘Sources’.
  • Press ‘Upload’ …!6.: Congratulations, you’ve contributed to our map!  The new Welsh name will appear on OpenStreetMap.cymru once the new data set has been updated overnight (and we will do our little happy dance!)  
  • Please share your contribution to openstreetmap.cymru on openstreetmap.org via its social media function for facebook, twitter & Google+ , not forgetting our hashtag #mapioCymru !
  • Many thanks for helping our #MapioCymru #Cymraeg2050 project,  sponsored by the Welsh Government.

Extra openstreetmap.cymru features

We’ve added a couple of features (well it was Carl really).

You can link to a particular place in Wales. Here’s Aberystwyth.

And you can embed the map in another web page.

AND you can put a pin on the map that you embedded on another webpage.

Here’s a map that shows you where our forthcoming Geospatial User Group workshop will take place.

Putting Cymru on the Map

ODI Cardiff node’s the score!

We’re all one step closer to listening to a Welsh speaking Sat Nav thanks to the Open Data Institute Cardiff, who are currently working on a ground-breaking initiative to populate the map of Cymru/Wales with its original, Welsh language names (with the possible exception of Swansea = Sven’s Sea, which was in fact originally a different geographic location from Abertawe = the mouth of the river Tawe).

This new map of Cymru can now be seen online at openstreetmap.cymru thanks to the ingenuity of the #MapioCymru project’s web designer Carl Morris.  This was shown publicly for the first time at Hacio’r iaith, where there was a groundswell of support from the tech & public sector experts who attended, which bodes very well in terms of a ‘Gwaddol’ / legacy for this #Cymraeg2050 project sponsored by the Welsh Government.

The next steps for this homegrown, ODI-Cardiff based project is for the people of Cymru to put their ‘square mile’ on the map. You don’t have to be square to register with openstreetmap.org

…but it does help if you’ve got a Google or Facebook account as then it’s all done in one touch.  And then you’ll be onto the newest New Frontier: technology!  You don’t have to be a Welsh speaker either, just as long as you can read your faithful friends, those bilingual roadsigns!

The project has been supported by a £19,900 grant from the Welsh Government’s Cymraeg 2050 fund which promotes Welsh in the community and Welsh language technology. Minister for the Welsh Language and Lifelong Learning, Eluned Morgan said;

“We want the use of Welsh to be a routine part of everyday life so that speakers at all levels feel confident in using it in formal and informal situations. Displaying Welsh place names will allow Welsh speakers to use mapping technology in their own language and to embed a map with Welsh place names and events like concerts, fundraisers, etc. on their own website.”

#MapioCymru is one of many Cymraeg 2050 projects that will make it easier for people to use the language, whether face to face in the community and in the workplace or through digital platforms.”

In order to know more how to contribute to the online map of Cymru, please contact our Project Manager Wyn @dailingual Williams mapiocymru@dailingual.com tel Cardiff 707 469

Map i Gymru: building an OpenStreetMap in Welsh

The draft map

Have a peek at this map of Wales, with place names in Welsh.

https://openstreetmap.cymru

Many people have never seen place names in Welsh such as Aberteifi, Treffynnon or Aberdaugleddau on an online map – or indeed any map.

These names have been used for many generations until the present day, from conversations to road signs to media. The Welsh-language Wikipedia, known to its users as Wicipedia Cymraeg, has articles bearing these names.

Nevertheless they are not usually offered or recognised by the well known proprietary map providers.

In order to build a map in Wales’ own language we at the project have drawn from freely licensed OpenStreetMap data, server software, and documentation. These are all the work of many contributors around the world, and to these people we are very grateful. We are also very thankful to the Welsh Language Unit of the Welsh Government who have funded this early work.

Building on the map

This is a draft map running on a prototype server. It gives you the ability to pan and zoom. As the developer on this project I am very pleased with the results so far.

I will introduce another feature very soon – the ability to embed this map on any website.

Nevertheless you might spot omissions or glitches while it’s being developed, and some big areas for functional improvement.

As I write this we have received a bundle of very useful place name data from the office of the Welsh Language Commissioner, which is itself the fruit of years of dedicated work. This is comprehensive down to the level of villages, and licensed under OGL.

Improving the data

This section contains background if you are interested in improving OpenStreetMap place names and other data.

Imports of the OSM data happen automatically overnight. Some pre-rendering of map tiles is also done, to speed things up.

The ideal OSM data set for place names in Welsh would have a name:cy tag for every single item. We are not there yet.

In the meantime my system uses name:cy tags and some name tags.

name:cy has highest precedence. If you want to add a definitive name in Welsh to anything, edit the map on osm.org and add a name:cy tag. You will need to create a user account if you don’t already have one. Provided your submission is accepted by the community this will guarantee its inclusion on the next nightly update.

Many name:cy tags already exist.


The challenge with the existing data is that some names that we want to use are currently only available from the name tag. That is, many places do not have a name:cy tag.

Understandably OSM contributors haven’t tended to add an identical name:cy tag for Morfa Nefyn, Abersoch, and hundreds of other villages and places.


I’ve tried rendering different versions of the map using different criteria. Enabling all name tags somewhat ruins the ethos and magic of having a map in Welsh. Then huge tracts of Wales vanished when I removed the name tags again!

So I have set the system to use name for these types of places only:

  • ‘village’
  • ‘hamlet’
  • ‘town’
  • ‘island’
  • ‘neighbourhood’
  • ‘square’
  • ‘farm’
  • ‘isolated_dwelling’
  • ‘locality’


For other elements I also have a white list and black list, e.g. ‘Ysgol’, ‘Capel’ and ‘Eglwys’ are on the white list, among others. We will tend to want names containing those words.

name:cy currently overrides all of this however. Do please add name:cy tags via osm.org if you spot errors or gaps, and they will also be available to other projects around the world.

Use and applications in the near future

What you see now is just one possible app that uses the underlying map infrastructure to show a map of Wales.

Having a map like this introduces many exciting possibilities in:

  • learning
  • exploration
  • navigation
  • play
  • research
  • communication.

ODI Cardiff's Mapping for Wales update

As we announced in November, we’ve received funding from the Welsh Government in order to produce an online Welsh language interface of OSM [Open Street Map].  

1st Progress report 

We’re very pleased to announce that we’ve already recruited a mapping infrastructure developer for our #MapioCymru project: Carl Morris has agreed to be our online developer for our pilot Welsh language interface for Open Street Map.

Carl has recently begun working freelance under his morris.cymru name after being one half of the successful Native HQ partnership.  He has an ocean of Welsh language experience and is keen to set his sights on the landscape of mapping Wales!

Croeso : welcome to the team Carl. : )

 

WE HAVE ALSO…

“…[met] with an officer of the Welsh Language Commissioner, who has a list of place names she approves with associated geodata…”

In line with our WG targets [see above], as soon as we received the news about the grant award in October we arranged to meet with WLC – who also process complaints pertaining to the Welsh Language Standards, which have in turn inspired many new Welsh language innovations.

We are also in touch with individuals who are already members of the GovCamp Cymru community & working at the Llyfrgell Genedlaethol / National Library  who look after the legacy for their Cynefin project.   Therefore, the first part of the work has been to see what’s already out there so there’s no unnecessary duplication of data.

WE WILL ALSO…

More to come soon, look out for our activity during January when we’ll be:

– publishing our Welsh language interface pilot
– attending haciaith and encouraging developers to make use of OSM
– starting to encourage organisations and communities in Wales to make use of the platform.

Let’s Map- io!

ODI Cardiff is working towards a Wales with a million Welsh speakers by 2050.